Trump, Safety Pins and Resistance

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This being my first writing since the election of Donald Trump, I’d like to admit being very wrong. Again. Like most observers, the chance of him even becoming the Republican presidential nominee seemed so remote, I completely discounted it. From an article last March, I apologized about that oversight, making note of how unprecedented it was that, in this day and age, a high profile politician could come so far while promoting nakedly racist policies, as opposed to the more socially palatable (yet just as fundamentally racist) economic agendas embraced by both Republican and Democratic elites.

Then, in late October, I predicted Trump’s defeat “which looks increasingly certain (barring some new sensational Clinton revelation), will only cement the 2nd Amendment alongside misogyny and comb-overs in American political consciousness.” In all fairness, however, the FBI re-opening Clinton’s email scandal was hardly new or sensational. The main disturbing revelations were long exposed, serving perhaps just enough of a reminder to tip the balance against her.

Not wanting to sound alarmist or overly demonize Trump voters, I’m well aware the White Nationalist element among them is not a majority. Many simply picked him as being the only candidate opposing Clinton, a status quo politician backed by the reviled economic 1%. Still, that’s no excuse. It’s an unacceptable decision to spite Wall Street hedge fund managers by actively sacrificing the vital interests of vulnerable fellow citizens and immigrants.

Now here we are. Trump the president-elect. Fascism represented among his senior staff. Racist attacks on the rise nationally. Nearby in Oregon, a black woman was beaten by brick wielding white men who allegedly praised Trump during the assault. It’s pretty much the kind of worse case scenarios that prompted me to become a gun owner in the first place. Already, I’ve been contacted by more Portlanders than usual seeking firearms training and information about concealed carry permits.

It remains to be seen if the true face of Trump in action will indeed swing federal power down in the worst ways, with mass deportations, religious registries and press censorship. Until then, his election emboldens bigots on a local level to increasingly abuse minorities. This must be strongly countered by every means available. It’s all very well and good to signal solidarity using safety pins, as many Americans are these days, but a symbol is only effective when backed with substance against violence. Many lynch mobs and racist attacks have been thwarted when opposed by armed resistance. Less so if sewing supplies are the only recourse.

Countless brave people from our shared history have successfully confronted fascism and state terror. In the coming months and years, we may be tested just as surely. The spirit of Harriet Tubman and Eleanor Roosevelt and the Abraham Lincoln Brigade live on inside everyone who chooses such paths. With those inspirational legacies, we still have hope for the future.

1 thought on “Trump, Safety Pins and Resistance

  1. Brittius

    The Good News, is, that you have opted to exercise your Second Amendment rights. That was the first step in the correct direction. The second step, is that you exercise your First Amendment rights, though I have reservation of what is stated, I respect your position.

    What is suggested to you and others within your age group or similar thinking, is to wait for the inauguration, and give the new administration not only a chance, but your support, because you have the most to gain from what is proposed by the president-elect. Your best days are ahead of you. Mine are long behind me, but I believe that there must be an America worthy for my grandchildren, and you, and others similar your age and thinking, to inherit this nation.

    Reply

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